You are a criminal for catching rain water on your own property videos shows

MAD APPROACH BY GOVERNMENTS TO COLLECTING WATER ON YOUR OWN PROPERTY

OREGAN WATER NAZIS USA.STEALING RAINWATER FROM THE GOVERNMENT

Governments control of your own resourcs is evil.STOP IT NOW.

www.handyhomehints.com

Henry Sapiecha

The Shape of Water: How Guillermo del Toro Designed His Latest Movie Water Monster

WATER MONSTERS CREATED FOR MOVIES

Filmmaker Guillermo del Toro is a virtuoso maker of monsters—from the Pale Man of Pan’s Labyrinth to Pacific Rim’s Kaiju, they’re wondrous yet terrifying. But the star of his new film, The Shape of Water, is no mere beast, del Toro says: “He’s a leading man.” The Cold War fairy tale depicts a doomed romance between a captive fish-man and a mute janitor (Sally Hawkins). Del Toro collaborated with sculptors for three years to perfect his amphibian, from the creature’s Renaissance nose to his statuesque derriere. (It’s carefully shaped from foam latex.) We asked the beastmaster to dissect his work.

Gleaming Eyes
“In sculpting the white of the eye, the imperfections are important. His acrylic eyes are backed by a reflective material so they catch the light, like a coyote’s eye in a car headlight.”

Defined Nose
“I wanted to make the Michelangelo’s David of amphibian men, so we created this Greek-like nose. He has an amazing profile.”

Fierce Claws
“If you make him adorable, it’s boring. So at first he seems threatening, then he seems cuddly, then he eats a goddamn cat. It’s important to keep the aggressive design lines.”

Agile Legs
Doug Jones wears the ­creature’s foam latex suit. “He moves like an animal in some scenes and like a toreador in others.”

Expressive Brow
“We made an eyebrow ridge that looks angry, then painted a line near it to appear sad. Depending on how we light him, the expression can change.”

Artful Gills
“The body paint refers to a Japanese engraving from the Edo period of a beautiful black fish.”

Sinewy Webbing
“This webbing makes him buoyant. If the creature were swimming, it would be like a hydrodynamic skydiving suit.”

Henry Sapiecha

www.fibreglassanimals .com.au

www.pythonjungle.com

Mine water management: recent results from India

One of the largest cement manufacturing companies in India, OCL India Limited, produces limestone from its open-cut Lanjiberna mine. With increases in mining depth, the mine is facing significant inflow of water, resulting in the formation of pit lakes. The area experiences significant rainfall during the monsoon months. OCL retained SRK India to help advise on potential water inflows with the deepening of the limestone pits and to develop a cost-effective mine water management solution.

Currently OCL operates three adjacent limestone pits with a fourth used to store pumped out water. During the initial phase of the study, SRK noticed that some water management practices had been overlooked causing high levels of inflow to the pits. The presence of large unlined water bodies and garland drains close to pit edges could be responsible for recirculating water. There were no interception or diversion structures to minimise the impacts of recirculation. Similar oversights were noted at some of theother projects that SRK India is presently involved in. For example, the pit at the Mangampet barytes mine is closely surrounded by unlined garland drains and water impoundment structures. To identify connections between water features, SRK suggested simple fluorescence-based tracer tests and accretion surveys along these drains.

To understand the water management issues at Lanjiberna mine, SRK developed a water balance model. It indicates the split between surface and groundwater inflows: about 5% is from direct rainfall onto the pit lakes, 45% from surface runoff, and the remaining 50% from groundwater seepage.

The Lanjiberna deposit belongs to a Precambrian metasedimentary sequence with multiphase folding and faulting. Landsat 8 satellite images and walk over surveys indicate large-scale lineaments intersect the Lanjiberna pits. Such narrow, elongated fracture zones may act as hydraulic pathways for groundwater flows into the pits. While overall groundwater inflows contribute about 50% of the pit lake water, a good proportion could be due to recirculation from nearby unlined water holding facilities.

Subsequently, SRK mapped the perennial (and seasonal) seepages inside the pit, which indicate reasonable correlation with narrow, linear structures and the regional groundwater flow pattern. Based on the preliminary water balance, SRK developed numerical models to estimate potential groundwater inflows. The results, though preliminary in nature, predict significant water inflows with progressive deepening of the pits.

Overall, it appears that restricting potential recirculation, improving existing storm water management and intercepting groundwater seepages by peripheral dewatering wells along the narrow fracture zones are key solutions for this operation. To validate this, SRK suggested further sitespecific data gathering, including detailed fracture mapping, Electrical Resistivity Tomography along selective transects, pumping tests, tracer tests and accretion surveys along the unlined garland drains.

Henry Sapiecha

www.www-globalcommodities.com

Mine Water Management Overview

As the mining industry focuses on improving productivity, reducing operating costs, and venturing into ever more challenging and remote locations for new projects, there is an increased need to look upon water as a whole-project issue.

Add broader perspectives such as stakeholder considerations and effects of a changing climate and water can present a significant risk to a mining project if not fully understood and managed. In this newsletter, we look at diverse aspects of water in the mining industry where SRK has added value and expertise to clients’ projects. There are several strong themes that come through in the articles:

A changing climate: many mines and projects are located in regions where climate patterns are already changing. The way water is managed on mine sites needs to adapt accordingly; from effective flood risk mitigation through to ensuring operational continuity under drought conditions.

Integrated water management: whole-operation water management begins with effective mine site water balances but also requires a joined-up approach between the various functional teams running the mine. Interactive dashboards are just one example of how diverse water management activities at an operation can be more effectively managed.

Focused studies: clients often want specific issues investigated, or solutions developed for a particular problem. The diverse range of technical water-related studies profiled here demonstrates the strength and depth of SRK’s experience which we apply to respond to our clients needs. Our understanding of mining operations and clients’ objectives and priorities enables us to design and implement studies in a focused and effective manner.

Groundwater management is one area where very specialised, niche studies are required to fully understand the conditions at a particular project site before appropriate solutions can be evaluated and designed.

Tailings facility management is another focus area for targeted studies. In both cases, the combination of targeted field investigations and testwork, careful data analysis and appropriate modelling are essential in delivering a successful outcome.

Water care and good governance: employing water re-use and minimisation methods in mining operations not only reduces costs but also reduces risks and improves corporate governance indicators. Mine operations are becoming increasingly aware of their water ‘footprint’ and the benefits this approach delivers.

Good neighbours: the increasing recognition of water as a finite resource to be safeguarded, managed and shared with the wider community is driving mining companies more and more to improved mine water management throughout the design, operational management and closure lifecycle of projects. The other way of looking at this is conflict-mitigation; working alongside and with local communities and being recognised as good neighbours.

In summary, SRK helps identify, manage and mitigate risks in mine water management while also highlighting opportunities through innovative thinking and embracing a whole project approach.

YOU WANT MORE INFORMATION CONTACTS HERE BELOW

Tony Rex: arex@srk.co.uk
Tom Sharp: tsharp@srk.com

Henry Sapiecha

Proposed timber tower would be a tall order drink of water for NYC

The Central Park Tower would rise to a height of 712 ft (217 m), making it the world’s tallest timber tower

New York City’s DFA Studio recently unveiled a blue sky proposal for an observation tower in Central Park. If built, it would be the world’s tallest timber structure and offer excellent views of NYC. Interestingly, it would also filter the Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Reservoir and turn it into a freshwater pond for everyone’s use.

Looking a little like a throwing dart with its slender form and long lightning rod spire, the Central Park Tower would rise to a total height of 712 ft (217 m). Inside, it would include some retail and restaurant kiosks, as well as a viewing platform offering 360-degree views of the area.

The tower would be made primarily from Glulam (glue-laminated timber), as was used extensively in the Oslo Airport extension. However, the design is actually quite complex structurally and would include a steel core, intricate wooden helix, and transparent PVC skin, and be anchored with a concrete base and stabilizing cables.

The integrated filtration system would be used to filter the currently fenced-off Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Reservoir (aka Central Park Reservoir), which non-locals may recognize as the big body of water featured in movies

es like Breakfast at Tiffany’s, turning it into a pond that could be used for all. One example shown is the water being used for sailboats.

“Located in the heart of Central Park, near some of New York’s most important cultural institutions, the underutilized 106-acre [42.9 hectare] body of water occupies one-eighth of the park’s total area and is 40-feet [12 m] deep, with approximately 1 billion gallons of contaminated water,” says the firm. “Aside from supplying water to the pool and Harlem Meer, the reservoir sits stagnant and fenced off due to its current state as a health threat to millions of New Yorkers, tourists and animals.”

The filtration system would be located in the tower’s lower section, within its steel core. The firm says that the considerable power necessary for running it would be met with a vertical axis wind turbine, which, though we’ve no figures to look at, seems a stretch.

DFA Studio also reports that thanks to prefabricated construction methods, the tower could be built as quickly as six months, though describes it as a “temporary” structure, so presumably its lifespan would be quite limited. Either way, we’ll stick our necks out and say this ambitious idea is unlikely to be built.

Source: DFA Studio

Henry Sapiecha

Plastic fibres found in piped tap water around the world, report reveals

Exclusive: Tests show billions of people globally are drinking water contaminated by plastic particles, with 83% of samples found to be polluted

The average number of fibres found in each 500ml sample ranged from 4.8 in the US to 1.9 in Europe. Photograph: Michael Heim/Alamy

Microplastic contamination has been found in tap water in countries around the world, leading to calls from scientists for urgent research on the implications for health.

Scores of tap water samples from more than a dozen nations were analysed by scientists for an investigation by Orb Media, who shared the findings with the Guardian. Overall, 83% of the samples were contaminated with plastic fibres.

The US had the highest contamination rate, at 94%, with plastic fibres found in tap water sampled at sites including Congress buildings, the US Environmental Protection Agency’s headquarters, and Trump Tower in New York. Lebanon and India had the next highest rates.

European nations including the UK, Germany and France had the lowest contamination rate, but this was still 72%. The average number of fibres found in each 500ml sample ranged from 4.8 in the US to 1.9 in Europe.

The new analyses indicate the ubiquitous extent of microplastic contamination in the global environment. Previous work has been largely focused on plastic pollution in the oceans, which suggests people are eating microplastics via contaminated seafood.

“We have enough data from looking at wildlife, and the impacts that it’s having on wildlife, to be concerned,” said Dr Sherri Mason, a microplastic expert at the State University of New York in Fredonia, who supervised the analyses for Orb. “If it’s impacting [wildlife], then how do we think that it’s not going to somehow impact us?”

A magnified image of clothing microfibres from washing machine effluent. One study found that a fleece jacket can shed as many as 250,000 fibres per wash. Photograph: Courtesy of Rozalia Project

A separate small study in the Republic of Ireland released in June also found microplastic contamination in a handful of tap water and well samples. “We don’t know what the [health] impact is and for that reason we should follow the precautionary principle and put enough effort into it now, immediately, so we can find out what the real risks are,” said Dr Anne Marie Mahon at the Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology, who conducted the research.

Mahon said there were two principal concerns: very small plastic particles and the chemicals or pathogens that microplastics can harbour. “If the fibres are there, it is possible that the nanoparticles are there too that we can’t measure,” she said. “Once they are in the nanometre range they can really penetrate a cell and that means they can penetrate organs, and that would be worrying.” The Orb analyses caught particles of more than 2.5 microns in size, 2,500 times bigger than a nanometre.

Microplastics can attract bacteria found in sewage, Mahon said: “Some studies have shown there are more harmful pathogens on microplastics downstream of wastewater treatment plants.”

Tap water is widely contaminated by plastic

Microplastics are also known to contain and absorb toxic chemicals and research on wild animals shows they are released in the body. Prof Richard Thompson, at Plymouth University, UK, told Orb: “It became clear very early on that the plastic would release those chemicals and that actually, the conditions in the gut would facilitate really quite rapid release.” His research has shown microplastics are found in a third of fish caught in the UK.

The scale of global microplastic contamination is only starting to become clear, with studies in Germany finding fibres and fragments in all of the 24 beer brands they tested, as well as in honey and sugar. In Paris in 2015, researchers discovered microplastic falling from the air, which they estimated deposits three to 10 tonnes of fibres on the city each year, and that it was also present in the air in people’s homes.

This research led Frank Kelly, professor of environmental health at King’s College London, to tell a UK parliamentary inquiry in 2016: “If we breathe them in they could potentially deliver chemicals to the lower parts of our lungs and maybe even across into our circulation.” Having seen the Orb data, Kelly told the Guardian that research is urgently needed to determine whether ingesting plastic particles is a health risk.

The new research tested 159 samples using a standard technique to eliminate contamination from other sources and was performed at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health. The samples came from across the world, including from Uganda, Ecuador and Indonesia.

How microplastics end up in drinking water is for now a mystery, but the atmosphere is one obvious source, with fibres shed by the everyday wear and tear of clothes and carpets. Tumble dryers are another potential source, with almost 80% of US households having dryers that usually vent to the open air.

“We really think that the lakes [and other water bodies] can be contaminated by cumulative atmospheric inputs,” said Johnny Gasperi, at the University Paris-Est Créteil, who did the Paris studies. “What we observed in Paris tends to demonstrate that a huge amount of fibres are present in atmospheric fallout.”

Plastic fibres may also be flushed into water systems, with a recent study finding that each cycle of a washing machine could release 700,000 fibres into the environment. Rains could also sweep up microplastic pollution, which could explain why the household wells used in Indonesia were found to be contaminated.

In Beirut, Lebanon, the water supply comes from natural springs but 94% of the samples were contaminated. “This research only scratches the surface, but it seems to be a very itchy one,” said Hussam Hawwa, at the environmental consultancy Difaf, which collected samples for Orb.

This planktonic arrow worm, Sagitta setosa, has eaten a blue plastic fibre about 3mm long. Plankton support the entire marine food chain. Photograph: Richard Kirby/Courtesy of Orb Media

Current standard water treatment systems do not filter out all of the microplastics, Mahon said: “There is nowhere really where you can say these are being trapped 100%. In terms of fibres, the diameter is 10 microns across and it would be very unusual to find that level of filtration in our drinking water systems.”

Bottled water may not provide a microplastic-free alternative to tapwater, as the they were also found in a few samples of commercial bottled water tested in the US for Orb.

Almost 300m tonnes of plastic is produced each year and, with just 20% recycled or incinerated, much of it ends up littering the air, land and sea. A report in July found 8.3bn tonnes of plastic has been produced since the 1950s, with the researchers warning that plastic waste has become ubiquitous in the environment.

“We are increasingly smothering ecosystems in plastic and I am very worried that there may be all kinds of unintended, adverse consequences that we will only find out about once it is too late,” said Prof Roland Geyer, from the University of California and Santa Barbara, who led the study.

Mahon said the new tap water analyses raise a red flag, but that more work is needed to replicate the results, find the sources of contamination and evaluate the possible health impacts.

She said plastics are very useful, but that management of the waste must be drastically improved: “We need plastics in our lives, but it is us that is doing the damage by discarding them in very careless ways.”

Henry Sapiecha

10 of the Most Dangerous Waters in the World ….BEWARE VIDEO SHOWS.

The world is 70 percent water, so it’s probably a good thing that the stuff is good for us. We can drink it, swim in it, grow food with it, and just plain live because of it. However, certain bodies of water are shockingly mean to us. Interacting with some lakes and rivers can hurt us, make us sick, or even kill us.

Hello guys and today we’re talking about 10 Bodies Of Water That Want You Dead

#10. Boiling Lake Dominica
Whoever named this place was certainly no fan of subtlety: Boiling Lake is exactly what it sounds like. Discovered in 1870 by two Englishmen, temperatures taken five years later ranged anywhere from 82 to 91.5 °C.

#9. Citarum River West Java, Indonesia
Here we have a body of water that can destroy us, but only because we screwed it up. Citarum River might well be the most polluted, trash-filled bit of water on the planet.

#8. Rio Tinto Spain
Rio Tinto is among the most acidic bodies of water around, with a pH balance of 2, at best. This means the Rio Tinto is as strong as stomach acid and is more than powerful enough to kill any fish that dare swim in it.

#7. Lake Kivu Of DRC And Rwanda
Three hundred meters (1,000 ft) below the surface of Lake Kivu lies a ticking time bomb. Over 250 cubic kilometers (60 cubic miles) of carbon dioxide, along with around 65 cubic kilometers (15 cubic miles) of methane gas, lurks under this body of water, enough to provide electricity to several countries.

#6. The Rivers Of Johannesburg South Africa
Catching E. coli is no fun under normal circumstances; now imagine you were literally swimming in the stuff.

#5. Blackwater River Virginia, USA
Too much water can be a bad thing, even if the water can’t kill you otherwise.

#4. Tualatin River Oregon, USA
Oregon’s Tualatin River is not the place to be if you want to take your dogs for a swim; close to a dozen pups die there every year from exposure to toxic blue-green algae.

#3. Lake Karachay Russia
Like a supermodel with a bomb strapped underneath her bodice, Russia’s Lake Karachay is pristine, gorgeous, and incredibly deadly. It is, without question, the most radioactive body of water on the planet.

#2. Belle Fourche River And South Dakota, USA
Belle Fourche isn’t poisonous, boiling, or radioactive. However, it is turbulent and wild, at least in one particular area.

#1. Potomac River Maryland–West Virginia Border, USA
Though the only thing most people know about the Potomac is that Washington, DC is situated on it, the legendary river can also be associated with something else: horrible deaths.

Thank you for watching!!! Does anyone want to come over and swim with me?

OOO

Henry Sapiecha

35 WORLD HOT SPOTS FOR THE CLEAREST WATER SWIMMING

Don your go-pro cam & explore these wonderworlds or ‘waterworlds’ more to the point

1…Linipacan-islands-Palawan-Philippines

2…Maldives- 

3…Dog-Island-San-Blas-Panama

4…Cayo Coco Cuba

5…Carla Marcarelleta Menorca Spain 

6…Sua Trench Samoa

7…Crater Lake Oregon

8…Sabah-Mantanani Islands Borneo

9…

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Mains water pipe bursts in Kiev Ukraine causing severe damage as seen in this video

Water mains pipe bursts in Kiev street causing massive damage to surroundings in this video

Henry Sapiecha

Surprising Source of Arsenic in Your Drinking Water—Will EPA Take Steps to Protect Your Health?

Pure water is one of the most important foundations for optimal health. Unfortunately, most tap water is far from pure, containing a vast array of disinfection byproducts, chemicals, heavy metals and even pharmaceutical drugs. Fluoride and arsenic are two prime examples of hazardous water contaminants.

Not only is the level of arsenic in US tap water high due to natural groundwater contamination, the most commonly used form of fluoride added to water supplies also tends to be contaminated with arsenic. As reported by the featured article:

“In early August, the Environmental Protection Agency is set to decide on a petition to change the source of fluoride in US drinking water.

Currently, the source of fluoride in most public water supplies is fluorosilicic acid, according to government records. The petition calls for the EPA to instead require the use of pharmaceutical-grade sodium fluoride in water fluoridation, which is the addition of fluoride to drinking water for the purpose of preventing cavities.

Fluorosilicic acid is often contaminated with arsenic, and recent research has linked the arsenic from fluorosilicic acid in drinking water to as many as 1,800 extra cases of cancer yearly in the United States…”

The petition was submitted by William Hirzy, a chemistry researcher at the American University in Washington, D.C. Hirzy previously worked at the EPA for 27 years.

His team recently published a study entitled: “Comparison of hydrofluorosilicic acid and pharmaceutical sodium fluoride as fluoridating agents – a cost-benefit analysis”, in the journal Environmental Science & Policy.

According to their estimation, switching the type of fluoride used to pharmaceutical-grade sodium fluoride would reduce the amount of inorganic arsenic contamination in drinking water by 99 percent!

The Health Dangers of Inorganic Arsenic

Inorganic arsenic is a powerful carcinogen that has been linked to an increased risk of several types of cancer. In 2001, the Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) lowered the maximum level of arsenic permitted in drinking water from 50 ug/L to 10 ug/L (or 10 parts per billion (ppb)) due to the established cancer risk.

The Natural Resources Defense Council estimates that as many as 56 million Americans living in 25 states drink water with arsenic at unsafe levels. According to the EPA:

“Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure is known to be associated with adverse health effects on several systems of the body, but is most known for causing specific types of skin lesions (sores, hyperpigmentation, and other lesions) and increased risks of cancer of the lungs and skin.”

Other impacts of chronic arsenic exposure include, according to the EPA:
  • Kidney damage and failure
  • Anemia
  • Low blood pressure
  • Shock
  • Headaches
  • Weakness
  • Delirium
  • Increased risk of diabetes
  • Adverse liver and respiratory effects, including irritation of mucous membranes
  • During development, increased incidence of preterm delivery, miscarriage, stillbirths, low birth weight, and infant mortality
  • During childhood, decreased performance in tests of intelligence and long-term memory
  • Skin lesions

Water Fluoridation Chemicals Are NOT Pharmaceutical Grade

While naturally-occurring arsenic in groundwater is one of the most common sources of exposure, hydrofluorosilicic acid—the most commonly used form of fluoride added to water supplies—is a toxic waste product from the phosphate fertilizer industry that is commonly contaminated with arsenic, radionucleotides, aluminum and other industrial contaminants.

According to the featured research, diluted fluorosilic acid adds, on average, about 0.08 ppb of arsenic to your drinking water.

Most people are shocked when they realize that the fluoride added to their water supply is actually a toxic byproduct from the fertilizer industry, opposed to a pharmaceutical-grade chemical. The source of most water fluoridation chemicals is explained by Michael Miller, a minerals commodity specialist for the US Geological Survey, in the featured article:

During the production of phosphate fertilizer, phosphate ore is reacted with sulfuric acid to produce toxic gases. These are taken out of the air after being sprayed with water, which produces fluorosilicic acid… The solution is sold to water systems nation-wide, where it is diluted and put into drinking water. Occasionally, it is treated to create sodium fluorosilicate. Together, these compounds (called silicofluorides) provide fluoride to 90 percent of U.S. drinking water systems that are fluoridated.

Water Fluoridation May Be Placing Infants at Great Risk

Not only is there mounting evidence that fluoride poses grave health risks to infants and children—including reductions in IQ—arsenic exposure in utero and during early childhood is also particularly problematic, as it can cause lasting harm to children’s developing brains, and endocrine and immune systems.

For example:
  • A 2006 study found that Chileans exposed to high levels (peaking at 1,000 ppb) of naturally-occurring arsenic in drinking water in utero and during early childhood had a six times higher lung cancer death rate compared to Chileans living in areas with lower levels of arsenic in their water. And their mortality rate in their 30s and 40s from another form of lung disease was almost 50 times higher than for people without that arsenic exposure.
  • A 2004 study showed children exposed to arsenic in drinking water at levels above 5 ppb had lower IQ scores. Earlier studies have linked chronic arsenic exposure to a range of cognitive dysfunctions, including learning disabilities, memory problems, poor concentration, and peripheral and central neuropathies.
  • A study published in 2011 examined the long-term effects of low-level exposure on more than 300 rural Texans whose groundwater was estimated to have arsenic at median levels below the federal drinking-water standard. It also found that exposure was related to poor scores in language, memory, and other brain functions.

Is It Worth Increasing Cancer Risk for Minimal, if Any, Benefit to Teeth?

Some proponents of fluoridation believe that the large dilution of these fluoridating chemicals that takes place when they are added at the public water works ameliorates concerns about the known contaminants. However, arsenic is a known human carcinogen, for which there is no safe level.

Inevitably, the addition of contaminated hexafluorosilicic acid to the water supply by definition must increase the cancer rate in the US because of the arsenic it contains, and this is exactly what Hirzy’s research shows. Why would any rational government do that to reduce – at best – a miniscule amount of tooth decay? According to Hirzy:

We found that the United States as a society is spending, conservatively speaking, $1 billion to $6 billion treating the excess bladder and lung cancers caused by arsenic in the most commonly used fluoridation chemical, fluorosilicic acid … The switch [to pharmaceutical-grade sodium fluoride] would cost $100 million, but would save billions in reduced cancer costs.

For people living in areas with fluoridated tap water, fluoride is a part of every glass of water, every bath and shower, and every meal cooked using that water. This makes absolutely no sense considering the carcinogenic nature of arsenic—especially in light of the epidemic of cancer.

Hirzy’s study is actually the first risk assessment of arsenic-contaminated fluoride in drinking water. This is particularly shocking considering the fact that fluorosilicic acids have been used since the early 1950s (prior to that, sodium fluoride, a byproduct of the aluminum industry, was typically used). Incredibly, while the EPA performs risk assessments for most drinking water contaminants, the agency does NOT oversee the addition of fluoridation chemicals. As stated in the featured article, this policy makes no sense whatsoever.

Under the Toxic Substances Control Act, the EPA has the authority to regulate or ban almost any substance — including fluorosilicic acid — that poses an ‘unreasonable risk’ to public health, [Hirzy] said.

Appropriations Bill Would Prohibit EPA’s Phase-Out of Sulfuryl Fluoride

While we’re on the topic of fluoride, a related news item is worthy of note. Drinking water is not the only source of fluoride, as I’ve discussed previously. Fluoride also enters the human food chain via fluoridated pesticides. According to a recent report, the House of Representatives Appropriations Interior and Environmental subcommittee has voted to approve an appropriations bill that cuts the EPA’s budget by nearly one-third.

What’s worse, the bill specifically prevents the EPA from enforcing its decision to phase out sulfuryl fluoride—a neurotoxic fumigant that has been linked to cancer and neurological, developmental, and reproductive damage. If it passes once markups by the Appropriations Committee are completed, it will move to a House vote. According to the news report:

This is an outrageous attempt to circumvent a basic risk assessment calculation that EPA acknowledges puts the public at risk, given current exposure patterns, to a chemical that is especially hazardous to children.

In response, Beyond Pesticides, the Environmental Working Group (EWG), and the Fluoride Action Network (FAN) submitted a letter to the House Appropriation Committee Chairman and Ranking members, urging them to remove the section in question (section 449) from the bill. You can help by writing or calling your state Representative, asking him or her to uphold the EPA’s ability to protect the health of all Americans by removing this hazardous pesticide from our food production. There’s no need for it, as there are many other viable alternatives, including:

  • Temperature manipulation (heating and cooling)
  • Atmospheric controls (low oxygen and fumigation with carbon dioxide)
  • Biological controls (pheromones, viruses and nematodes)
  • Less toxic chemical controls, such as diatomaceous earth

Water Filtration – A Must for Clean Pure Water…

If you have well water, it would be prudent to have your water tested for arsenic and other contaminants. If you have public water, you can get local drinking water quality reports from the EPA. In general, most water supplies contain a number of potentially hazardous contaminants, from fluoride, to drugs and disinfection byproducts (DBPs), just to name a few.

I strongly recommend using a high-quality water filtration system unless you can verify the purity of your water. To be absolutely certain you are getting the purest water you can, you’ll want to filter the water both at the point of entry and at the point of use. This means filtering all the water that comes into the house, and then filtering again at the kitchen sink. I currently use a whole house carbon-based water filtration system, and prior to this I used reverse osmosis (RO) to purify my water.

You can read more about water filtration in this previous article to help you make a decision about what type of water filtration system will be best for you and your family. Since most water sources are now severely polluted, the issue of water filtration and purification couldn’t be more important.

Ideal Water Sources

Besides purification, I also believe it’s critical to drink living water. I recently interviewed Dr. Gerald Pollack about his book, The Fourth Phase of Water: Beyond Solid, Liquid, and Vapor. This fourth phase of water is referred to as “structured water” and is the type of water found in all of your cells. This water has healing properties, and is naturally created in a variety of ways.

Water from a deep spring is one excellent source of structured water. The deeper the better, as structured water is created under pressure. There’s a great website called FindaSpring.com where you can find a natural spring in your area.

But you can also promote structured water through vortexing. I personally drink vortexed water nearly exclusively as I became a big fan of Viktor Schauberger who did much pioneering work on vortexing about a century ago. Dr. Pollack found that by creating a vortex in a glass of water, you’re putting more energy into it, thereby increasing the structure of the water. According to Dr. Pollack, virtually ANY energy put into the water seems to create or build structured water.

My own R&D team is working on a careful study in which we use vortexed water to grow sprouts, to evaluate the vitality and effectiveness of the water. We are conducting extensive internal research to develop the best vortex machine on the market, because we believe an ideal vortexer could be one of the simplest ways to improve people’s health.

Water Fluoridation Is Anything But Safe…

According to Bill Hirzy, water fluoridation remains a government policy because of “institutional inertia [and] embarrassment among government agencies that have been promoting this stuff as safe.” This is probably true, yet it’s shameful that the practice is allowed to continue in the face of overwhelming evidence showing the health hazards of not just fluoride itself, but also of related contaminants such as arsenic.

Clean pure water is a prerequisite to optimal health. Industrial chemicals, drugs and other toxic additives really have no place in our water supplies. So I urge you to join the Fluoride Action Network’s efforts and your local anti-fluoride movements in the US and Canada.

Henry Sapiecha

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